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Nicholas Coroneos - A Review: Art, Technology and Words

The idea for his current stone series stems from his childhood experience

By Jimmy Centeno
Published on LatinoLA: December 24, 2016


Nicholas Coroneos - A Review: Art, Technology and Words


Nicholas Coroneos's installation and stone sculpture exhibition at The Art Core Center at Union Center for the Arts is joined with an audio sound component. The word engraved stone series for artist Coroneos is an "attempt to illuminate some vital challenges concerning contemporary communication." Today the velocity of technological development in communications is the instant mutation of traditional forms of expressions. The work is a play of words, catch phrases, some dipped in humor and others glazed with thought provoking questions. He puts forth a playful challenge to our senses and brings forth social concerns.

The idea for his current stone series stems from his childhood experience when his mother would say "nothing is written in stone." Growing up in Washington D.C and exposed to the Vietnam Memorial Monument, both experiences would germinate together to become the point of convergence for his most recent sculpture/ stone installation.

Nicholas Coroneos was born in Frankfurt, Germany. At a very early age his family migrated to the United States. His interest in drawing led him to work as draftsman for an engineering firm. Along with his draftsman career he studied art and art history.

The sound effect in the exhibition of dripping water adds an extra element that quarrels between hearing and listening. It is a quest to re-engage in a tangible inward conversation and its relation to the exteriority surrounding our thoughts. This incorporated sound effect stems from one of his cave excursions in the country of Belize. After tuning out all sound and exposed to the dripping of water from stalagmites, it no longer sounded like water drops, but conversations.

His most prominent installation titled "Loss for Words" consists of a 9-level vertical layering of black 8"x18"x3" polished granite stone engraved with common short sayings pointing roughly in 27 directions with a decomposed granite circle surrounding the base. The multiple engravings steered in multiple directions separate from any cohesive message except one minimal flash of words invites the viewer to circle around a stella like totem.

Away from a complete thought with engraved everyday expressions, "Loss of Words" cross examines the banality of emotions trapped in words that might no longer spark. Are such expressions doors with close signs that conceal language stagnation or are they doors with open signs that invite the birth of possibilities towards understanding and reconciliation?

Nicholas Coroneos seems to work in ways that bring him back to his point of inspiration, "nothing is written in stone." During the transportation and delivery, a granite stone accidentally broke in two. Such incident could not have happened to the least expected stone out of the 35 pieces in exhibit. It read the following, "you never get a second chance to make a first impression." Coroneos's adaptability in his art making process is his open door to the birth of possibilities, flexibility and forgiveness that exposes the play of words and means of expressions.

What are today's parameters and what is the role of technology today in the formulation of empathy or apathy? For philosopher Felix Guattari any machine or technology is social before it is technical. It is precisely what Coroneos seeks. The installation takes hold of a subliminal conversation to rethink the limits between words and new ways of being. The all black polished stone granite short of a mirror like reflection, is a quest for a language that can contain the seed of harmony, empathy and dignity.

Despite that his series is open to multiple interpretations his work is an embodiment that reveals a call to humanity for self-reflection as individuals in a world community

His art can be viewed at: http://www.coroneosart.com/

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